TFuG.i

(Torn.Fu.i)

Translated from "Die deutschen Funknachrichtenanlagen bis 1945 - Band 2 "Der Zweite Weltkrieg" by Fritz Trenkle

In 1943, the Lorenz company introduced the Torn.Fu.i on the direction of the weapons office. This is a two-stage 3 Watt transmitter with 1x RL2,4P2 and 1x RL4,2P6 (a very rare tube type), the receiver is designed around 9x RV2,4P700. For the A3 operation (voice), modulation is accomplished with a Hapug (Harbich-Pungs-Gerth) configuration.This is a power saving modulation procedure, where the carrier amplitude automatically adjusts to the modulation factor (carrier control). This transceiver is ultra-compact and more compact than it's predecessors such as the Torn.Fu.g.

In the same year as construction began, this device was used as a more powerful replacement for the Torn.Fu.b1, Torn.Fu.f and Torn.Fu.k. It was also used by mountain radio troops.


The serial number of this unit is 00961. Two other exiting units in Germany have serial numbers 00453 and 01119. From this it can be inferred that no more than around 1200 of these units were manufactured, and all of them in 1944. (Günter Hütter)


The antenna sections from the Torn.Fu.g work with this transceiver. To my knowledge, no one has an antenna base to this unit. There are 2 types of antenna bases that came with the Torn.Fu.i. One has an antenna-tuning spool, and a simplified base. There is also a whip antenna, similar as for the Feldfu.b1. (Günter Hütter)


There is also an accessory box, which is of the same size and construction as the transceiver case. A highly complex test aparatus came with the unit. This device was called the Prüfgerät TFuGi. (Nr. 157 44) (Günter Hütter)


In current literature, the HAPUG system was developed in the 1930s and never made it beyond the experimental stages. This transceiver proves this wrong.

Reference 1: Energy Conservation and Reception Quality for Dynamic Amplitude Modulation, Institute of Radio Technology Report Number 22/80, G. Petke and J. Mielke, 7 August 1980.

Dynamic Amplitude Modulation (DAM) was then commercialized by Telefunken (then AEG Telefunken, today Transradio) during the 1980s.

 
Specifications
 
YEAR INTRODUCED :
1944
 
MANUFACTURER: Lorenz
 
FREQUENCY RANGE:
1.8 - 3.0 MHz


NUMBER OF CRYSTALS:
None

PRESET FREQUENCIES:
None

ANTENNA:

TUNING:
Super heterodyne

SENSITIVITY:

SELECTIVITY:

POWER SOURCE:

Battery 2,4NC58 or two 2,4NC28, or a manual generator, or a 5-pin power cable connected to the accessory box.


SIMILAR SETS

POWER OUTPUT:
3 Watts

TUBES (TYPE and NUMBER):

Transmitter with 1x RL2,4P2 and 1x RL4,2P6 (a very rare tube type), the receiver is designed around 9x RV2,4P700.


USE:
This device was used as a more powerful replacement for the Torn.Fu.b1, Torn.Fu.f and Torn.Fu.k. It was also used by mountain radio troops.

TYPE OF SIGNAL:
CW and voice

RANGE: (MILES)

TO COMMUNICATE WITH:

TO REPLACE IN PART: Torn.Fu.b1, Torn.Fu.f and Torn.Fu.k.
   
MANUAL: D 1043/5
 
TRANSPORTATION:
 

 

The front of the transceiver with the top section of the cover opened.

 

 

Rear of transceiver with cover closed.

 

 

Power cord hatch.

 

 

Left side.

 

 

Right side

 

 

Top of transceiver. Note the ground connector, antenna mount and volt-meter cover.

 

 

Voltmeter cover open. There is a mirror on the inside of the cover.

 

 

The front of the transceiver with the top section of the cover opened.

 

 

Frequency adjustment knob, data plate, and headphone/microphone connection sockets.

 

 

Volt meter switch: (S-II, S-I, A-E, A-S) - although I am not sure what these abbreviations represent.

 

 

Instructions on the inside of the top front cover. There is a holder for the remote control here.

 

 

The front cover is completely opened. The remote control unit can be seen to the left.

 

 

Additional operating instructions.

 

 

Battery compartment on the left and accessory compartment on the right.

 

 

Rear of the transceiver with the cover open. The wooden block (#6) was used to separate two "2,4 NC 28" batteries, when that configuration was installed.

 

 

Power connection and use instructions.

 

 

The vibrator power supply. The serial number matches the one from the transceiver. Connection for the test device "TFuG i". Does anyone have this device?

 

 

Another view of the power bays from the rear.

 

 

Battery connectors.

 

 

Inside of the case with the transceiver unit removed.

 

 

Female connectors at the rear of the transceiver bay.

 

 

Documentation pocket.

 

 

The transceiver unit without the case.

 

 

Top of the transceiver unit. Note the voltmeter's position on top of the unit. Here the oscillator tube can be seen for the transmitter (RL 2,4 P2)

 

 

Right side of the transceiver. Note the ultra-rare RL4,2P6 vacuum tube serving as the transmitter power amplifier. Oscillator, mixer and HF amplifier for the receiver.

 

 

Close up of the RL 4.2 P6 tube.

 

 

Receiver tubes: 2 IF amplifier tubes, detector and LF amplifier.

 

 

Male connector for coupling with the case, insertion guides, and screw-top handle for pulling tubes.

 

 

The second oscillator tube for the receiver and the modulation tube for the transmitter.

 

 

Remote control with cable.

 

 

Receiver fine tuning and volume control.

 

 

Connector pin-out.

 

 

Female connector on the transceiver.

 

 

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